Committee

President

Clarissa Campbell Orr
Clarissa Campbell Orr, currently President of the Society for Court Studies, is Reader in Enlightenment, Gender and Court Studies at Anglia Ruskin University (full profile page), Cambridge Campus, UK. She is best known for her two edited collections, Queenship in Britain 1660-1837: Royal Patronage, Dynastic Politics and Court Culture (Manchester, 2002) and Queenship in Europe 1650-1789: The Role of The Consort (Cambridge, 2004), both of which grew out of a Society for Court Studies conference in 1999. She has contributed essays to many publications including Johan Zoffany, Society Observed (London and New Haven, 2011), which accompanied the exhibition of this name; An Enlightenment Statesman in Whig Britain: Lord Shelburne (1737-1805) in Context (Woodbridge, 2011), co-edited with Nigel Aston; Mrs Delany and her Contemporaries (London and New Haven, 2009), also accompanying an exhibition in New Haven and London; and The Hanoverian Dimension to British History, (Cambridge, 2007), co-edited by Brendan Simms and Torsten Riotte. Currently she is at work on a biography of the court insider and botanical artist, Mary Granville Delany 1700-1788.

UK Committee

North American Committee

The Court Historian Editors

Curt Noel (Secretary)
David Gelber (Treasurer & Administrator)
David Gelber is a historian, writer and editor. He was educated at the London School of Economics and the University of Oxford, where he completed a doctorate examining the role of heralds and heraldry in political, diplomatic and court culture in England between c.1480–1600. He has worked at the College of Arms, Index on Censorship, Apollo and Literary Review and co-convened the 2011 Society for Court Studies conference, Courts and Capitals, 1815-1914 (IV): From Alexandria to Tokyo.
Janet Dickinson (Conference Secretary)
Olivia Fryman (Seminar Secretary)
Dr Olivia Fryman is currently Research Curator at Historic Royal Palaces. Prior to this she undertook her Masters degree in the History of Design at the Royal College of Art and the Victoria & Albert Museum, and in 2011 completed an AHRC collaborative doctoral award with Kingston University and Historic Royal Palaces. Her thesis was focussed on housekeeping in the royal bedchambers at Hampton Court Palace 1689-1737. Olivia’s research focusses on the material culture of the English court in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and in particular the decoration and maintenance of palace interiors. She also had a keen interest in the housekeepers at royal palaces and the domestic servants of the court.
Nicola Clark (Seminar Secretary)
Dr Sara Wolfson (Publicity Officer)

Dr Sara Wolfson is a Lecturer in Early Modern History at Canterbury Christ Church University (full profile page). Prior to this she lectured in Early Modern British and European history at Manchester Metropolitan University. She completed her AHRC funded PhD at Durham University in 2010 on the female court and household of Queen Henrietta Maria. She is currently reworking her thesis for publication as a monograph, focusing on the political, social and religious roles that Caroline court women played in the period 1625-1669. She has recently published a chapter on the politics of Henrietta Maria’s female Bedchamber in Nadine Akkerman and Birgit Houben (eds.), The Politics of Female Households: Ladies-in-Waiting across Early Modern Europe (Leiden: Brill, 2013). Sara's research also focuses on transnational relations between the Dutch Republic and the Stuart crown in 1641-3. This will form part of a wider project that explores the transnational nature of royalism.

Edward Town
Dr Edward Town is currently the Leverhulme Post-Doctoral Research Assistant for the Making Art in Tudor Britain project at the National Portrait Gallery. Prior to joining the gallery Edward undertook his Masters degree in the History of Design at the Royal College of Art and the Victoria & Albert Museum. Following this he completed an AHRC sponsored collaborative PhD with the University of Sussex and the National Trust on the early-seventeenth century transformation of Knole House in Kent. Edward’s research focuses on the artistic, artisanal, and architectural practices of late-medieval and early-modern London. He also has a keen interest in the material culture of the period and in particular, the patronage of court elites such as Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset, who was the subject of his doctoral thesis.
Andrew Barclay
Andrew Barclay - Senior research fellow with the 1640-1660 Section of the History of Parliament Trust. His 1994 Cambridge PhD was on the court of James II and he has since published a number of articles on the British court in the late seventeenth century. His other publications include Electing Cromwell (2011). He is also one of the editors of The Writings and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell to be published by Oxford University Press.
Wolf Burchard
Wolf Burchard is a curatorial assistant at the Royal Collection, and PhD candidate at the Courtauld Institute of Art. He read history of art and architecture at the universities of Tübingen, Vienna and the Courtauld Institute. His doctorial research on Charles Le Brun and the unity of the visual arts, seeks to examine the relationship between the artist’s different fields of activity as well as to disentangle certain discrepancies between his theory and practice. At the Royal Collection, he is currently assisting the Surveyor of The Queen’s Pictures in preparing an exhibition on art in Britain in the reigns of George I and George II, opening at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace in 2014.
www.royalcollection.org.uk/
Anna Keay
Philip Mansel
Philip Mansel received his doctorate for a thesis on The Court of France 1814-1830 at London University in 1978. He has written lives of Louis XVIII (1981) and the Prince de Ligne (2003); histories of Constantinople: City of the World's Desire 1453-1924 (1995) and Paris between Empires 1814-1852 (2001); studies of The Court of France 1789-1830 (1989) and royal and court dress from Louis XIV to Elizabeth II, Dressed to Rule (2005). His latest books are Levant: Splendour and Catastrophe on the Mediterranean (2010), a history of Smyrna, Alexandria and Beirut since 1600, and, co-edited with Torsten Riotte, Monarchy and Exile: the Politics of Legitimacy from Marie de Medicis to Wilhelm II (2011). He is currently writing a biography of Louis XIV. Six of his books have been translated into French. In 1995 he was a founder with David Starkey, Robert Oresko and Simon Thurley of the Society for Court Studies, and he is the Editor of the Society's journal, The Court Historian. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Historical Research, the Royal Historical Society, the Royal Asiatic Society, and the Royal Society of Literature and a member of the Conseil Scientifique of the Centre de Recherche du Château de Versailles. His web site can be visited at www.philipmansel.com
Dries Raeymaekers
Dries Raeymaekers (1982) is Assistant Professor of Early Modern Political History at Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherlands), where he teaches courses on court history, political culture and the representation of power in the early modern period. He studied History at the University of Leuven and received his doctorate at the University of Antwerp in 2009. His dissertation on the court and household of the Archdukes Albert and Isabella in Brussels (1598-1621) was awarded the Bi-Annual Prize for Historical Research by the Province of Flemish-Brabant (Belgium). In 2010 he received a Fulbright Scholarship for Research which enabled him to spend a semester as a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA. Afterwards he returned to Antwerp to become a Postdoctoral Fellow of the Research Foundation – Flanders, with a research project on princely favourites in the Habsburg Low Countries. In November 2012, he organized an international conference on the notion of access to the monarch, entitled ‘The Key to Power? The Culture of Access in Early Modern Courts, 1400-1700’ (Antwerp, 8-9 November 2012).
Jonathan Spangler
Jonathan Spangler is a senior lecturer in early modern European history at Manchester Metropolitan University, England. His doctoral research focused on the foreign princes in 17th-century France, notably the Lorraine-Guise, about whom he has published articles and a monograph. Recent work has focused on spreading this study more widely, exploring the role of aristocratic ‘trans-regionalism’ from 16th-century Scotland to 18th-century Belgium. Current research projects include a study of the court of Lorraine under its last independent dukes (1660-1737), and a study of the role of “Monsieur” —the brother of the king— in the French monarchy. He has recently taken on the role of co-editor of The Court Historian, the journal for the Society for Court Studies. Jonathan did his first degree at William & Mary in Virginia, then worked for several years in Washington and New York as a museum exhibition designer, before completing a DPhil at Oxford University - academic webpage:
Simon Thurley
Simon Thurley is one of the founder members of the Society. With a PhD from the Courtauld Institute his primary area of interest has been the architecture of the Tudor and Stuart Court. He has published monographs of Whitehall Palace, Hampton Court, Somerset House and Oatlands and has written a thematic book on Tudor Royal palaces. He also has an extensive periodical bibliography. He has formerly been Curator of the Historic Royal Palaces and Director of the Museum of London. He is now the head of English Heritage. His latest books are Men From the Ministry, a history state heritage protection in England for Yale University Press and a history of building in England for Harper Collins.

Malcolm Smuts (Chairman)
Malcolm Smuts taught in the History Department of the University of Massachusetts Boston until his retirement in May 2012; he now holds the rank of professor emeritus. His publications include Court Culture and the Origins of a Royalist Tradition in Early Stuart England (University of Pennsylvania, 1987; paperback edition 1999); Culture and Power in England 1585-1685 (Palgrave, 1999) and two edited collections of essays, The Stuart Court and Europe: Essays in Politics and Political Culture (Cambridge, 1996) and The Politics of Space: European Courts c. 1500-1750 (Bulzoni, 2008). He continues to work on the political and cultural history of early modern England and European courts and has most recently published a chapter, “Prince Henry and his World” in the catalogue for the current exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery, The Lost Prince: The Life and Death of Henry Stuart.
Lawrence Bryant
Robert Bucholz

Robert Bucholz is a Professor of History at Loyola University, Chicago. His publications include The Augustan Court: Queen Anne and the Decline of Court Culture (Stanford University Press, 1993); with Sir John Sainty, KCB, Officials of the Royal Household 1660-1837, 2 vols. (Institute of Historical Research, London, 1997-98); with Prof. Newton Key of Eastern Illinois University, Early-modern England 1485-1714: a Narrative History (Blackwell, 2003; 2nd ed., Wiley Blackwell, 2009); and with Prof. Joseph Ward of the University of Mississippi, London: a Social and Cultural History 1550-1750 (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

He is the project director of The Database of Court Officers (DCO), which contains the basic career facts of every person who served in the British sovereign’s household from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 to the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837. The Database of Court Officers may be found at or by “googling” Database of Court Officers.

He is currently working on Courtiers: a Social and Cultural History of the British Court 1660-1783 (contracted to Oxford University Press) and an extension of the DCO to include the households of ancillary members of the royal family.

Bucholz is past President of the Midwest Conference on British Studies and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

George L. Gorse

Major Fields
Italian Renaissance Art & Architecture; Italian Baroque Art & Architecture; Medieval Art History; History of Cities, Palaces, Villas & Gardens; History of Genoa.

Publications - Book
Marcello Fantoni, George Gorse, Malcolm Smuts, eds., The Politics of Space: European Courts, ca. 1500-1750 (Rome: Bulzoni Editore, 2009).

Publications – Articles
“Cicero’s Portrait and the Roman Villa,” in Cicero Refuses to Die: Ciceronian Influence through the Centuries, ed. N. Van Deusen & C. Oefelein, Brill, Leiden, 2013.
“The Renaissance City,” in Encyclopedia of Urban Studies, ed. R. Hutchinson, Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 2009.
“Myron Hunt and the ‘Academical Village,’ 1908-15,” in Pomona College: Reflections on a Campus, ed. Marjorie L. Harth (Claremont, CA, 2007), 53-59.
“Christopher Columbus and Andrea Doria: The Two Worlds of Renaissance Genoa,” in Mediterranean Studies, vol. XVI (2007), 120-142.
“A Question of Sovereignty: France and Genoa, 1494-1528,” in Italy and the European Powers: The Impact of War, 1500-1530, ed. C. Shaw (Leiden: Brill, 2006), 187-203.
“Augustan Mediterranean Iconography and Renaissance Hieroglyphics at the Court of Clement II: Sebastiano del Piombo’s Portrait of Andrea Doria,” in The Pontificate of Clement VII: History, Politics, Culture, ed. K. Gouwens & S. Reiss (London: Ashgate, 2005), 313-339.
“Genova: repubblica dell’Impero,”in Storia dell’architettura italiana: il secondo Cinquecento, ed. C. Conforti & R. Tuttle (Milan: Electa, 2001), 240-265.
“Genoa: Art in Society,” in Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, ed. P. Grendler (New York: Charles Scribner, 1999 ), vol. 3, 26-29.
“Doria”; “Caffaro”; and “Embriaco,” in Medieval Italy: An Encyclopedia (New York: Garland, 2002).
“Genoa,” in Medieval Italy: An Encyclopedia , 2 vols. (New York: Garland, 2002), vol. I, 399-405; co-authored with Steven Epstein
“Agricultural Practice and Garden Design in Renaissance Genoa,” in Design and Construction in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era: Essays in Honor of Bradford Blaine, ed. N. Van Deusen (Ottawa: Institute for Medieval Music, 1998).
“A Classical Stage for the Old Nobility: The Strada Nuova and Sixteenth-Century Genoa,” Art Bulletin 79 (1997), pp. 301-327.
“B. Bianco”; “G. B. Castello”; “B. Cantone”; “G. Lurago”; “R. Lurago”; “D. Ponzello”; “G. Ponzello”; “G. Ratti”; and “B. Spazio,” in The Dictionary of Art (London: Macmillan, 1996).
“Committenza ed ambiente nella ‘corte’ di Andrea Doria a Genova,” in Atti del convegno. Arte, committenza ed economia a Roma e nelle corti del Rinascimento, 1420-1530, ed. A. Esch and C. Frommel (Rome & Milan: Einaudi, 1993), pp. 255-271.
“Entrate e trionfi: cerimonie e decorazioni alla Villa Doria in Genova,” in Atti del simposio. Il disegno genovese dal Cinquecento al Settecento, ed. M. Newcome Schleier (Florence: Medicea, 1992), pp. 9-36.
“Between Republic and Empire: Triumphal Entries in Genoa during the Sixteenth Century,” in ‘All the world’s a stage…’: Art and Pageantry in the Renaissance and Baroque, ed. B. Wisch & S. Munshower (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1990), pp. 189-256.
“A Family Enclave in Medieval Genoa: The Piazza San Matteo,” Journal of Architectural Education 41 (1988), pp. 20-24.
“An Unpublished Description of the Villa Doria during Charles V’s Entry into Genoa, 1533,” Art Bulletin 68 (1986), pp. 319-322.
“An Unpublished Drawing by Perino del Vaga for the Villa Doria, Genoa,” Master Drawings 23-24 (1985-86), pp. 193-198.
“The Villa of Andrea Doria in Genoa: Architecture, Gardens, and Suburban Setting,” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 44 (1985), pp. 18-36.
“Genoese Renaissance Villas: A Typological Introduction,” Journal of Garden History 3 (1983), pp. 255-280.

Works in Progress
Pleasure and Politics in Renaissance Genoa: The Villa of Andrea Doria
Neptunus Maris: The Emblematic Portraits of Andrea Doria
Strada Nuova: A Classical Stage for the Old Nobility in Renaissance Genoa
Civic Ritual in Renaissance Genoa: The Libri Cerimoniali of the Republic
A Mercantile Republic: An Urban History of Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Genoa
Rubens in Genoa: The Palazzi di Genova and the “Middle Aristocracy”
The Virgin Mary, Queen of Genoa (1637): Baroque Civic Iconography and Ceremonial Conflict

Linda Levy Peck
Magdalena Sanchez
Richard Wortman

Richard Wortman, James Bryce Professor of History, has specialized in the history of imperial Russia. He received his B. A. from Cornell University and his Ph. D. from the University of Chicago. He taught at the University of Chicago from 1963 to 1977, and Princeton from 1977 to 1988, before coming to Columbia. His publications include The Crisis of Russian Populism (Cambridge University Press, 1967) and The Development of a Russian Legal Consciousness (University of Chicago Press, 1976). (Russian translation, NLO Press, 2004). His books include Scenarios of Power: Myth and Ceremony in Russian Monarchy. Volume One: From Peter the Great to the Death of Nicholas I (Princeton University Press, 1995), Russian translation, (OGI Press,2002), and the second volume of the work From Alexander II to the Abdication of Nicholas II (Princeton University Press, 2000), (Russian translation, OGI Press, 2004), which was awarded the George L. Mosse prize of the American Historical Association. The two volumes were awarded the 2006 Efim Etkind prize of the St. Petersburg European University for the best western work on Russian culture and literature. His latest book is an abridged and revised one-volume version of Scenarios is Scenarios of Power: Myth and Ceremony in Russian Monarchy: From Peter the Great to the Abdication of Nicholas II (Princeton University Press, 2006). In November 2007, he received the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies’ highest award, for Distinguished Contributions to the Field of Slavic Studies. His current work concerns representations of imperial power and the culture of rule of Russian monarchy.

Philip Mansel
Philip Mansel received his doctorate for a thesis on The Court of France 1814-1830 at London University in 1978. He has written lives of Louis XVIII (1981) and the Prince de Ligne (2003); histories of Constantinople: City of the World's Desire 1453-1924 (1995) and Paris between Empires 1814-1852 (2001); studies of The Court of France 1789-1830 (1989) and royal and court dress from Louis XIV to Elizabeth II, Dressed to Rule (2005). His latest books are Levant: Splendour and Catastrophe on the Mediterranean (2010), a history of Smyrna, Alexandria and Beirut since 1600, and, co-edited with Torsten Riotte, Monarchy and Exile: the Politics of Legitimacy from Marie de Medicis to Wilhelm II (2011). He is currently writing a biography of Louis XIV. Six of his books have been translated into French. In 1995 he was a founder with David Starkey, Robert Oresko and Simon Thurley of the Society for Court Studies, and he is the Editor of the Society’s journal, The Court Historian. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Historical Research, the Royal Historical Society, the Royal Asiatic Society, and the Royal Society of Literature and a member of the Conseil Scientifique of the Centre de Recherche du Château de Versailles. His web site can be visited at www.philipmansel.com
Jonathan Spangler
Jonathan Spangler is a senior lecturer in early modern European history at Manchester Metropolitan University, England. His doctoral research focused on the foreign princes in 17th-century France, notably the Lorraine-Guise, about whom he has published articles and a monograph. Recent work has focused on spreading this study more widely, exploring the role of aristocratic ‘trans-regionalism’ from 16th-century Scotland to 18th-century Belgium. Current research projects include a study of the court of Lorraine under its last independent dukes (1660-1737), and a study of the role of “Monsieur” —the brother of the king— in the French monarchy. He has recently taken on the role of co-editor of The Court Historian, the journal for the Society for Court Studies. Jonathan did his first degree at William & Mary in Virginia, then worked for several years in Washington and New York as a museum exhibition designer, before completing a DPhil at Oxford University.

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